The Fury part 7

She had seated herself at the end of the boat, half turning her back to him, so that he could only see her profile. She wore a sterner look than ever; the low, straight brow was shaded by her hair; the rounded lips were firmly closed; only the delicate nostril occasionally gave a wilful quiver. After they had gone on a while in silence, she began to feel the scorching of the sun; and, unloosening her bundle, she threw the handkerchief over her head, and began to make her dinner of the bread; for in Capri she had eaten nothing.

Fetched out a Couple

Antonio did not stand this long; he fetched out a couple of the oranges with which the baskets had been filled in the morning. “Here is something to eat to your bread, Laurella,” he said. “Don’t think I kept them for you; they had rolled out of the basket, and I only found them when I brought the baskets back to the boat.”

“Eat them yourself; bread is enough for me.”

“They are refre

The Fury part 6

“Not enough to give me macaroni twice a week, if I had had nothing but the boat—only a letter now and then to take to Naples, or a gentleman to row out into the open sea, that he might fish. But you know I have an uncle who is rich; he owns more than one fine orange garden; and, ‘Tonino,’ says he to me, ‘while I live you shall not suffer want; and when I am gone you will find that I have taken care of you.’ And so, with God’s help, I got through the winter.”

“Has he children, this uncle who is rich?”

Long in Foreign Parts

“No, he never married; he was long in foreign parts, and many a good piaster he has laid together. He is going to set up a great fishing business, and set me over it, to see the rights of it.”

“Why, then you are a made man, Tonino!”

The young boatman shrugged his shoulders. “Every man has his own burden,” said he, starting up again to have another look at the weather, turning his ey

The Fury part 5

When, after two hours’ rowing, they reached the little bay of Capri, Antonio took the padre in his arms, and carried him through the last few ripples of shallow water, to set him reverently down upon his legs on dry land. But Laurella did not wait for him to wade back and fetch her.

Gathering up her little petticoat, holding in one hand her wooden shoes and in the other her little bundle, with one splashing step or two she had reached the shore. “I have some time to stay at Capri,” said the priest. “You need not wait—I may not perhaps return before tomorrow. When you get home, Laurella, remember me to your mother, I will come and see her within the week. You mean to go back before it gets dark?”

“If I find an opportunity,” answered the girl, turning all her attention to her skirts.

“I must return, you know,” said Antonio, in a tone which he believed to be one of great indifference. “I shall wait here till the Ave Maria. If you shou

The Fury part 4

“By his ill treatment of her; he beat her and trampled upon her. I well remember the nights when he came home in his fits of frenzy. She never said a word, and did everything he bade her. Yet he would beat her so, my heart felt ready to break. I used to cover up my head and pretend to be asleep, but I cried all night.

And then, when he saw her lying on the floor, quite suddenly he would change, and lift her up and kiss her till she screamed and said he smothered her. Mother forbade me ever to say a word of this; but it wore her out. And in all these long years since father died, she has never been able to get well again. And if she should soon die—which God forbid!—I know who it was that killed her.”

The little curato’s head wagged slowly to and from he seemed uncertain how far to acquiesce in the young girl’s reasons. At length he said: “Forgive him, as your mother has forgiven! And turn your thoughts from such distressing pictures, Laurella; there

The Fury part 3

They went on a while in silence. The sun now stood resplendent above the mountain chain; only the tip of Mount Vesuvius towered beyond the group of clouds that had gathered about its base; and on the Sorrento plains the houses were gleaming white from the dark green of their orange gardens.

“Have you heard no more of that painter, Laurella?” asked the curato—“that Neapolitan, who wished so much to marry you?” She shook her head. “He came to make a picture of you. Why would you not let him?”

“What did he want it for? There are handsomer girls than I. Who knows what he would have done with it? He might have bewitched me with it, or hurt my soul, or even killed me, mother says.”

“Never believe such sinful things!” said the little curato very earnestly. “Are not you ever in God’s keeping, without whose will not one hair of your head can fall? and is one poor mortal with an image in his hand to prevail against the Lord? Besides, you

The Fury part 2

“Laurella!” cried the priest. “And what has she to do in Capri?” Antonio shrugged his shoulders. She came up with hasty steps, her eyes fixed straight before her.

“Ha! Arrabiata! goodmorning!” shouted one or two of the young boatmen. But for the curato’s presence, they might have added more; the look of mute defiance with which the young girl received their welcome appeared to tempt the more mischievous among them.

“Goodday, Laurella!” now said the priest. “How are you? Are you coming with us to Capri?”

“If I may, padre.”

“Ask Antonio there; the boat is his. Every man is master of his own, I say, as God is master of us all.”

“There is half a carlino, if I may go for that?” said Laurella, without looking at the young boatman.

“You need it more than I,” he muttered, and pushed aside some orange baskets to make room: he was to sell the oranges in Capri, which little isle of rocks has never

The Fury part 1

Paul Heyse (1830 – 1914)

Heyse was one of the most distinguished and highly respected German writers of the past century. Poet, novelist, dramatist, critic, he “created a new standard of style and artistic finish for the novelette.” The Fury appeared in Heyse’s first collection of stories, which was published in 1855. It is generally regarded as one of the very best stories in the German language.

Reprinted from the volume Tales from the German of Paul Heyse, New York, 1878, D. Appleton & Co., publishers, by whose permission it is here used. The original title is Arrabbiata.

The Fury

The day had scarcely dawned. Over Vesuvius hung one broad gray stripe of mist, stretching across as far as Naples, and darkening all the small towns along the coast. The sea lay calm. Along the shore of the narrow creek that lies beneath the Sorrento cliffs, fishermen and their wives were at work already, some with giant cables drawing their bo

Sahara

As big as 9 million square meters, this vast desert is located at the north of Africa. ‘Sahara’ is an Arabic word meaning ‘desert’. Against popular belief, not all of Sahara is covered with sand. In addition to sand dunes that are called ‘ergs’ and make up one fifth of the desert, there are rocks and taluses. There are even mountains as high as 3 thousand meters.

Situated at the South America, the Amazon Basin is the land around Amazon River. Rain forests grab the most attention in this basin. As long as 6 thousand 400 kilometers, this river is one of worlds longest and this resource is considered as the world’s oxygen source with its rain forests. The forests house thousands of plant and animal species, a number of local communities live in these forests.

Derived from ‘neilos’ (‘river bed’) in Greek River Nile was called as iteru’ (big river’) in Ancient Egypt. World’s longest ri

Travel Bulgaria

A temptation to travel Bulgaria to see the Monastery and its unique architecture

Travel Bulgaria – The Rila Monastery – unity of spirituality, culture and nature…

travel bulgaria rila monestery

The Monastery has a unique architecture and takes about 8800 sq.m. When one looks from outside, it resembles a fortress. Due to its 24-metre stone walls, the Monastery has the shape of an irregular pentagon. Once the visitor travel Bulgaria is in, though, they are impressed by its architecture. Impressive arches and colonnades, covered wooden stairs and carved verandas…

St. Ivan of Rila

The hermit St. Ivan of Rila founded the monastery during the rule of Tsar Peter I. It is normal that the monastery bears the hermit’s name. Actually the hermit lived

Children and Old Folk

Ivan Cankar (18—?—1919)

Cankar was one of the most promising of the younger group of Slovenian writers. He had established a solid reputation as novelist, dramatist, and writer of short stories. His most significant work was produced late in his life. The volume, Dream Visions, from which Children and Old Folk is selected, appeared in 1917.

This story is here published for the first time in English. The translation is by Helen P. Hlacha.

Children and Old Folk

Each night, before they went to bed, the children
used to chat together. Seating themselves on the ledge of the broad oven, they
uttered whatever came into their minds. Through the dim window the evening
twilight peered into the room with dream-laden eyes. Out of every corner the
silent shadows drifted upwards, carrying strange stories with them.

They spoke of whatever came to their minds, but to their minds came only pleasant stories of sunlight and warmth interwoven w